The Great London

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London is considered as one of the greatest cities in the world! But that is why it also costs a lot more money to stay longer time here and not everyone can afford it.

This city offers many different kinds of food and vegetarians have plenty of choice as-well. Tea is the drink that most of the people drinking London and in whole England. Apart from the food, there are a lot of attractions that are very beautiful and they are worth wasting time to visit them. National Gallery, Science Museum, Tower of London, London Eye are just some of the attractions that are very popular and recommended to visit if you ever go to London .If you like green space then you do not have to travel far to find a part or a garden. There are eight beautiful Royal parks, Hampstead Heath and many different gardens and parks that will help you relax and enjoy being there. London has many famous sport clubs such as Chelsea and Arsenal. Many of the visitors are coming for seeing their favorite team playing. You can enjoy wonderful views using the river bus services and river tours. The Thames flows through Central London and it provides you stunning backdrop to a lot of London’s top tourist attractions.

Fun fact: There are more French people that live in London than in Bordeaux, Strasbourg or Nantes. Brits call their cross-channel neighbors “frogs”.

Georgetown Streets, Malaysia

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On arrival, visitors are usually intrigued by the narrow, congested streets of Georgetown and its pulsating waterfront. It is here, on the waterfront, that Penang is linked to the 20th century by the flotilla of freighters and streamers anchored in the harbor, which cause the ferryboats from Butterworth to zigzag a 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) winding course to reach the landing at Weld Quay.

Penang is a Far East warehouse for everything imaginable, from electronic gadgets to plastic toys. There are silks from Thailand and India, fabric from England, cameras from Germany and Japan, textiles from America and from Malaysia, brocade and sarongs. Jalan Pinang (Penang Road) is the main shopping market. Shops open in the early morning and do not close until the bars are empty and the late moviegoers have cleared the streets.

Lebuh Campbell, just off Penang Road is the main “Chinese” shopping center where Nepalese street vendors sell nylon shirts, fake alligator-skin shoes, laughing jack-in-the-boxes, and precious stones, guaranteed to cut glass.

Perhaps the most exciting shopping in Penang is in the many junk shop along Rope Walk. Here, shoppers must literally climb over mounds of discarded gear. Those who do not mind getting their hands dirty are certain to discover a dusty thing or two. One London boutique saleswomen found a luxurious Chinese emperor’s robe salvaged from the local opera stage. So, why don’t you give a try and you might find something more interesting that you expected.

Batu Ferringhi

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The road to Penang’s north coast follows the curve of the land, twisting up and around a hill or skirting the fringe of the sea. Rocky headlands jutting out into the sea divide the shoreline into small bays and coves, each with a different character and charm. Although the waters are not as clear as on the East Coast, the beaches are still popular for swimming and sunbathing.

Most activities are centered around Batu Ferringhi, one of the most popular beaches in Southeast Asia. Batu Ferringhi is locates about 20 kilometers (12.5 miles) from Penang city. The large luxury hotels and resort of Shangri – La’s Rasa Sayang Resort, Golden Sand Resort, Parkroyal Penang Resort, Lone Pine Hotel, Hydro Hotel, Holiday Inn Resort, The Bayview Beach Resort, Hard Rock Hotel and more can be found. Their facilities include water-skiing, sailing, windsurfing, water scooters and horse riding. Smaller and older, but comfortable and reasonable price, are Palm Beach Resort and Sri Sayang Resort. Small inns and motels as well as many villagers in this area also offer accommodation.

As the sun set, Batu Ferringhi comes alive with a carnival-like atmosphere with an open-air bazaar selling anything from ornate curios to enticing souvenir items. Anyway, water sports and beach activities are the main entertainment during daytime. Besides, tourists are advised to beware of jellyfish, in case you get stung, apply vinegar (get from any restaurant nearby) and get to the nearest clinic. When the moon rises, night market and restaurant are the best place to go.

Night-time Niceties in Georgetown

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The streets of Georgetown, Penang are made for nightlife. The Chinese, in particular, never seem to go to bed. Their open-front restaurants are noisy gathering places where waiters shout your order to someone in a back room. A jukebox, if there is one, is turned on full volume. Hawker stalls on Gurney Drive and the Esplanade do a thriving business, while brightly lit stores cater to late-night shoppers. At the fashionable hotels, latecomers wait in line at the discotheques. There are roof top restaurants where dinners look down over the city light, hills and harbor, and dark cellar cabarets with no view at all.

Those who prefer to seek entertainment in bars can find a few around Georgetown and on the northern outskirts of the city. Some small and friendly establishments, like Hong Kong Bar, keep a “family album” of snapshots showing just about every traveler who has walked in and bought a drink. They provide jukeboxes for dancing, game machines for entertainment and barmaids for conversation. If you prefer a light music and comfortable surroundings, I would like to recommend the Penang Bar Street, along the stretch of Penang Road from Cititel Hotel and to where it intersects with Lebuh Farquhar. Others are more consciously sophisticated, like the Farquhar Bar in the Eastern & Oriental Hotel, which only operate until midnight.

At the Heart of History

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Penang Museum and Art Gallery, located is Georgetown, Penang, a 15 minutes walking distance from the Fort Cornwallis. Walk into the compound of the Penang State Museum and Art Gallery, and you will first be greeted by a regal bronze statue of Captain Sir Francis Light, the founder of the Penang Straits Settlement, gazing down upon you. In Penang Museum, on the other side of the street, visitors can peer into a Chinese bridal chamber created in the lavish style of the 19th century, when Malaysian Chinese girls took great pride in the quality beadwork on their slippers. One room, dedicated to a glimpse of yesteryear, is hung with old paintings and etching from the days when Fort Cornwallis was the center of town. Another is an opulent showcase of bejeweled krisses, the dragger-like weapons Malay used for protection and for prestige.

On the first floor where the Art Gallery is located, display batik painting, oils, graphics and Chinese ink drawings. Most of the techniques are new but the solemn, moody sea scenes and village portraits recapture a way of life that is little changed from the pioneer days.

The Penang Museum & Art Gallery open from 9am to 5pm daily except Friday and Public Holiday. Admission Fees for Art Gallery Art Gallery is free. RM 1 for adult and RM 0.50 for children will be charged for visiting the Museum.

Fort Cornwallis

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The Fort Cornwallis, named after the Governor General in Bengal in the late 1700s, Charles Cornwallis, is one of the most interesting historical landmarks in Georgetown, Penang. It is located close to the Esplanade, next to the Victoria Memorial Clock. Originally, Fort Cornwallis was a wooden structure. Between 1808 and 1810, it was rebuilt with convict labor. Today, the old fort still stands, but its precincts have been converted into a public park and playground. Its ramparts are still guarded by the old cannons; the most venerable and famous of which is Seri Rambai”, known to many Penang residents as “the travelling cannon”. The cannon has certainly travelled. Cast in Holland, it was presented by the Dutch to the Sultan of Johor in 1606. Seven years later, in a devastating raid on Johor, it was captured by the Achenese in search of a Bugis alliance. After the British bombarded Kuala Selangor in 1871, the cannon was captured and brought to Penang.

For several years, it was left lying in the sea off the Esplanade until it was hauled out and places as its present location. Like most ancient cannons, Seri Rambai is attributed with magical powers; it is believed that women desiring children will have their wish fulfilled if they place flowers in the cannon’s barrel and offer a pray. Legends are always a beautiful mystery, but that is not a loss for giving a try.

The Coast of Navy

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Pangkor lies off the coast of Perak, and is the most popular beach resort in the state. To get there, you need to take the road from Ipoh to Sitiawam and Lumut. The broad Perak River is crossed at Bota Kanan, where there is a hatchery for river terrapins. After the town of Sitiawam, head for the coast at Lumut, the principal base for the Malaysian Navy. Their officers, ships and apartments can be seemed from Pangkor just across the bay.

Many local don’t even make the crossing to Pangkor, but instead make to Teluk Batik, a pleasure beach resort 6.5 kilometers (4 miles) from Lumut. There are some resorts in Teluk Batik recommended by the tourism Malaysia, which are Teluk Batik Resort, Marina Cove Resort, Crystal Bay Chalet and Impian Chalet. Others go to the Wilderness Adventure Camp, south of Lumut, where activities are arranged to exercise the body and to teach adults and children alike about life in the forest. Make an appointment at www.wilderness-adventure.com.my and custom your own adventure with your friends and family. The Pesta Laut (Sea Festival) is held in Lumut in August every year, and sea sport competitions, funfairs and food outlets attract the crowds. Pangkor can also crowd during this time and any of the Malaysian school holidays; so if you like the beach to yourself, make sure you choose the right month.

A pioneer’s castle

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Kallie’s castle (Kallie’s Fort) is located near Batu Gajah, and is about 20 minutes from Ipoh, Perak. Some years ago this building was overgrown with wild fig and banyan trees spreading over and into it, but an effort has been made to rescue this interesting structure from the encroaching foliage. It stands on the land of what was once the estate of William Kellie Smith, a rubber plantation owner who made his fortune in Malaya (Old name of Malaysia). The house was intended to be his second home, but it was never entirely finished, as Smith died while he was visiting his native Scotland. The house was meant to be reminded of his Scottish castle far away, but now it lies all but forgotten, and the remnants of its fine architecture and the orange colored bricks lying in ruins give it the air of something from a fairy tale.

Smith was an interesting man, who was evidently popular with his South Indian worker. A Hindu shrine stands nearby, erected for the plantation worker during a time of sickness. Amongst the figures of animals and gods, stands a man in a white suit and hat, presumably Smith himself. A walk around the ruin is to step back into the prosperous days of colonial life. A bridge has now been built across the river, providing access from main road. Tours can also be arranged from Ipoh.

A Walk along the Old Perak

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Kampar, a very Chinese town at the foot of Bujang Melaka on the main trunk road south of Perak, prides itself as being largest of these towns, while Gopeng has its long gone prosperity wanly reflected in its largest wooden market, the Chinese theatre and the signified rows of shop houses. Walk along and you can see the Kampar Independent Clock Tower located at the center of the town. Some old and historical restaurant or stalls along the road might make appetite. Clay pot Chicken Rice, Sago Dessert and Chinese Egg Tarts are Kampar delight. Where to go? Which restaurant? No worries walk and spot a restaurant with a small crowd, and that’s the place you go. Otherwise, take a walk in the market in the morning or night, delicious local food just around the corner.

Just south of Gopeng, a narrow side road to the right branches off to Kota Bharu, a little village on the railway, it then leads on to Mekam Teja, the tomb of Bendahara Alang Iskandar, one of the great state officers of 19th-century Perak and a direct ancestor of the present ruler. As is often the case with the graves of distinguished Malays, the site has become a shrine (keramat) visited by humble folk in search of blessings or tradition that a newly installed Sultan of Perak must pay his respects at this shrine.

The Underground Riches

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The Kinta Valley, whose tin production of long time ago was half that of the rest of Malaysia combined and 17 percent that of the world’s total, stretches funnel-shaped for 70 kilometers (45 miles) from Sungai Siput (Siput River) in the north of Ipoh (Capital city of Perak state) to Kampur in the south. The speedy North-South-Highway cuts straight across these hills joining Ipoh with the Perak River Valley and Kuala Kangsar.

What was once a vast expanse of forest crossed by sluggish jungle streams and swamps has over the past 100 years been virtually denuded of all its trees, its swamps drained and even the course of the Kinta River straightened out; the land now lies flat and open, offering nothing but the vistas of deserted mining pools spreading over the bleached scars of tin tailings; dotted here and there are the wooden palong (boxes) of the Chinese mines; and floating majestically in pools of their own making are the huge tin dredges.

Mining townships, occupying land once roamed by wild herds of elephant, scatter themselves over the face of this valley. Some, like Ipoh, rose with the tin industry, but when the local tin deposits were exhausted, they declined and shriveled into villages or even became a ghost town, like Papan, Tronoh and Pusing. Some, such as Batu Gajah and Gopeng, were once greater and more prosperous than Ipoh itself. Take a walk in this small town and discover the history of mining.