Universal Studios Singapore

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Universal Studios Singapore is a theme park located within Resort World Sentosa in Sentosa Island, Singapore. It was a key component of Genting’s bid for the right to build a Singapore second integrated resort it is the second Universal Studio theme park in Asia (First in Japan), and the first in Southeast Asia. Universal Studios Singapore has since attracted more than 2 million visitors in the first 9 months from the opening.

Universal Studios Singapore is divided into 7 unique and fun zones, which are the Madagascar, the Palace of Far Far Away from the world of Shrek was the first in the world, The Lost World where you can find a world of Dinosaurs and Waterworld, Ancient Egypt – a world full of ancient Egyptian mummies, Sci-fi, a futuristic city and the last two zones are the famous city in America, Hollywood and New York. All these zones are equipped with amazing and interesting games, shows and ride. Besides, Universal Studios has prepared the amazing ‘Hollywood Breams Parade’ on every Saturdays, Sundays and selected holidays. Be amazed as the Hollywood Dreams blockbuster movie and beloved characters on magnificent floats that go beyond your imagination. There are a few packages for the entry to the theme park, you might want to check it out at the Universal Studios Singapore official website for more information. Anyway, it is SGD 74 for adult and SGD 54 for children from 4 to 12 years old for the One Day Pass. It might spend you a day to go through the whole theme park, so facilities, shopping and restaurants are well prepared in Universal Studios. There are more than 30 restaurants and food stores; gift and souvenir stores are located according to every theme in the park. Don’t forget to bring back some gift for your friends!

Why to visit Germany

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Germany is a country with rich history and a country that has a lot of things worth visiting. This country is the home of Beethoven and Back and it boasts around 300 theatres, 630 art museums and 130 professional orchestras. If you are art-lover, then this is the country you should visit.

German is the primary language but a lot of the population speak English as-well which makes it easy for the visitors to communicate. The Germans are friendly and they will answer all of your questions. Germany is divided into 16 diverse states and each region has different food and drink specialties. This is great place to experience adrenaline rush since this country is the home of the high performance cars. You can rent a car for a drive on the autobahn, where there are no speed limits.

One of the most popular events in Europe is Oktoberfest which is held in Munich. If you attend this beer fest you will meet people from all over the world. The food you get in Germany is different than the food in many other countries. You get served a huge plate full of food and not some stylishly decorated little morsel. There is something interesting for everyone, if you are going here with kids, or even if you are going alone, you should take a look at Europa Park which is the 2nd most popular theme park resort in Europe after Disneyland in Paris.

Why to visit Switzerland

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Switzerland is known for the banks but there are many other reasons why you should visit this country. If you want to explore something new and have fun, then you should visit it. There are many snow-capped mountains and the Swiss Alps are the most famous mountains in Switzerland. If you visit this country during the winter, this is the place you should go to. There are 16 lakes that you can visit during any time of the year. All of them are looking great and the view is amazing. There are also rivers that have bathing spots. Punting is popular in Bern and Basel with Many locals commuting to work this way.

The most visited place in Switzerland is Rhine Falls. It is Europe’s largest waterfall. It is 75ft high and is a sight you should not miss fi you visit Switzerland, especially in the summer. It is recommended to visit the 36.000 square foot Masoala Rainforest Hall in Zurich. It is recreation of a real rainforest in Madagascar, where you can see wildlife, ferns, insects, rubber trees and even fish you would find on the small island off the coast of Africa. This country does not have a lot of history but there are many different buildings that you can visit and find amazing. Their technology is up to date so you can feel the difference when you are there.

Why to visit Austria?

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The unique thing that you can hear here is yodeling. It is unique form of singing that everyone finds interesting. The earliest yodel was recorded in the middle of 16th century and this tradition continues to this day. If you are interested in Mozart, Schubert, Strauss or Beethoven, then you can learn a lot more about them in this country. If you are big fan of classical music, then you already know that the best orchestra in the entire world is the Vienna Philharmonic.

You cannot miss the Alps if you ever visit this country. The Austrian Alps are the country’s most popular tourist destination and the main reason why tourists come here. That is why there are more visitors during the winter.

The Austrian food is something you have to taste if you ever visit this country. It is a lot more than just wiener schnitzels and apple strudels, even they are both delicious. There are many delicacies that you should try and if you like eating sweets, then you should try the delicious type of chocolate cake – Sarchertorte. Austrians are making wine and brewing beer for a very long time and some of the traditional coffee houses in Vienna are some of the oldest in the world. Viennese coffee is something very delicious, made of two shots of espresso, whipped cream and chocolate sprinkles.

Kuan Yin Temple

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Of all the Chinese temples in Penang, the oldest Kuan Yin Temple is Lebuh Pitt. As is fitting, it is also the most humble and most crowded. This temple belongs to the people in the street – the noodle hawkers, the trishaw riders, and the housewives doing the daily shop in the market, the old shopkeepers calculating cupboards, repairing bicycles or selling sundries. Kuan Yin, a Buddhist god that shows the most mercy.

She is ever-present on Chinese altars, whether the worshippers be Taoist, Buddhist or Confucian. Throughout the day, people visit her temple to burden her with problems they cannot solve or to thank her for the blessing which ended their worries. The clicking of “divining sticks” ricochets throughout the halls as devotees ask her advice for the coming week, men and women of Georgetown know that Kuan Yin will reply. She is perhaps the most beloved divinity of all the Chinese altars in Penang. The worshipping of Kuan Yin is a meeting ground between traditional Chinese belief and Buddhism.

Kuan Yin Temple has a well-worn look. The halls are heavily laden with scented smoke. The floors are littered with joss sticks wrappers and discarded shopping bags. The altars look like a banquet table with roasted chickens, sweet cakes, oranges, pineapples and cookies neatly placed as humble offerings to the goddess. If you are not a Buddhist, you may just want to walk by and take a photo of this oldest temple in Penang.

The Coast of Navy

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Pangkor lies off the coast of Perak, and is the most popular beach resort in the state. To get there, you need to take the road from Ipoh to Sitiawam and Lumut. The broad Perak River is crossed at Bota Kanan, where there is a hatchery for river terrapins. After the town of Sitiawam, head for the coast at Lumut, the principal base for the Malaysian Navy. Their officers, ships and apartments can be seemed from Pangkor just across the bay.

Many local don’t even make the crossing to Pangkor, but instead make to Teluk Batik, a pleasure beach resort 6.5 kilometers (4 miles) from Lumut. There are some resorts in Teluk Batik recommended by the tourism Malaysia, which are Teluk Batik Resort, Marina Cove Resort, Crystal Bay Chalet and Impian Chalet. Others go to the Wilderness Adventure Camp, south of Lumut, where activities are arranged to exercise the body and to teach adults and children alike about life in the forest. Make an appointment at www.wilderness-adventure.com.my and custom your own adventure with your friends and family. The Pesta Laut (Sea Festival) is held in Lumut in August every year, and sea sport competitions, funfairs and food outlets attract the crowds. Pangkor can also crowd during this time and any of the Malaysian school holidays; so if you like the beach to yourself, make sure you choose the right month.

A pioneer’s castle

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Kallie’s castle (Kallie’s Fort) is located near Batu Gajah, and is about 20 minutes from Ipoh, Perak. Some years ago this building was overgrown with wild fig and banyan trees spreading over and into it, but an effort has been made to rescue this interesting structure from the encroaching foliage. It stands on the land of what was once the estate of William Kellie Smith, a rubber plantation owner who made his fortune in Malaya (Old name of Malaysia). The house was intended to be his second home, but it was never entirely finished, as Smith died while he was visiting his native Scotland. The house was meant to be reminded of his Scottish castle far away, but now it lies all but forgotten, and the remnants of its fine architecture and the orange colored bricks lying in ruins give it the air of something from a fairy tale.

Smith was an interesting man, who was evidently popular with his South Indian worker. A Hindu shrine stands nearby, erected for the plantation worker during a time of sickness. Amongst the figures of animals and gods, stands a man in a white suit and hat, presumably Smith himself. A walk around the ruin is to step back into the prosperous days of colonial life. A bridge has now been built across the river, providing access from main road. Tours can also be arranged from Ipoh.

A Walk along the Old Perak

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Kampar, a very Chinese town at the foot of Bujang Melaka on the main trunk road south of Perak, prides itself as being largest of these towns, while Gopeng has its long gone prosperity wanly reflected in its largest wooden market, the Chinese theatre and the signified rows of shop houses. Walk along and you can see the Kampar Independent Clock Tower located at the center of the town. Some old and historical restaurant or stalls along the road might make appetite. Clay pot Chicken Rice, Sago Dessert and Chinese Egg Tarts are Kampar delight. Where to go? Which restaurant? No worries walk and spot a restaurant with a small crowd, and that’s the place you go. Otherwise, take a walk in the market in the morning or night, delicious local food just around the corner.

Just south of Gopeng, a narrow side road to the right branches off to Kota Bharu, a little village on the railway, it then leads on to Mekam Teja, the tomb of Bendahara Alang Iskandar, one of the great state officers of 19th-century Perak and a direct ancestor of the present ruler. As is often the case with the graves of distinguished Malays, the site has become a shrine (keramat) visited by humble folk in search of blessings or tradition that a newly installed Sultan of Perak must pay his respects at this shrine.

The Underground Riches

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The Kinta Valley, whose tin production of long time ago was half that of the rest of Malaysia combined and 17 percent that of the world’s total, stretches funnel-shaped for 70 kilometers (45 miles) from Sungai Siput (Siput River) in the north of Ipoh (Capital city of Perak state) to Kampur in the south. The speedy North-South-Highway cuts straight across these hills joining Ipoh with the Perak River Valley and Kuala Kangsar.

What was once a vast expanse of forest crossed by sluggish jungle streams and swamps has over the past 100 years been virtually denuded of all its trees, its swamps drained and even the course of the Kinta River straightened out; the land now lies flat and open, offering nothing but the vistas of deserted mining pools spreading over the bleached scars of tin tailings; dotted here and there are the wooden palong (boxes) of the Chinese mines; and floating majestically in pools of their own making are the huge tin dredges.

Mining townships, occupying land once roamed by wild herds of elephant, scatter themselves over the face of this valley. Some, like Ipoh, rose with the tin industry, but when the local tin deposits were exhausted, they declined and shriveled into villages or even became a ghost town, like Papan, Tronoh and Pusing. Some, such as Batu Gajah and Gopeng, were once greater and more prosperous than Ipoh itself. Take a walk in this small town and discover the history of mining.

The Cameron Highlands

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The Cameron Highland is one of the Malaysia’s most extensive hill stations. Not part of Perak but Pahang, but they can only be reached through Perak. The road to the Highlands branches off the main trunk highway 60 kilometers (37 miles) south of Ipoh (capital city of Perak state). It shoots off toward the hills and for 90 kilometers (56 miles) winds and twists its way to the top. As cool air funnels down the mountain pass, the temperature drops. Palms and banana trees give way to deep jungle growth. Coniferous trees appear, fern line the road and clusters of bamboo add the touch of a Chinese scroll painting.

The Cameron Highlands are actually spread out over three districts. For the newcomer it can be a little confusing, and at first somewhat disappointing, especially when after 48 kilometers (28 miles), you arrive at Ringlet, the first district and a rather ugly little settlement. Better push on! Four kilometers (2.5 miles) later comes the pretty Sultan Abu Bakar Lake, a man made body of water formed by the damming of the Bertam River, and extensively covered with lush green plants. Perched on a bluff above the lake is The Lakehouse hotel, a Tudor style building with sweeping views of the surrounding valley. Pay a visit to the vegetables and fruit farms, Strawberry Farm, Bee Farm, Butterfly Garden and the Flower Garden. For shopping advice, visit the tourist souvenir shops or the night market.